One of the best museums in Tokyo, the Edo-Tokyo Museum is housed in a bizarre multi-storey building which is meant to evoke an old raised kurazukuri-style warehouse

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Half Day Walking Tour To Find Edo Culture Including Ukiyoe in a Sumo Town Ryogoku

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 4 hours

$91

... also the Sumida Hokusai Museum and the Edo-Tokyo Museum where you can step into the Edo culture world. The tour fee inc...

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Edo-Tokyo Museum, Tokyo

One of the best museums in Tokyo, the Edo-Tokyo Museum is housed in a bizarre multi-storey building which is meant to evoke an old raised kurazukuri-style warehouse.

One of the best museums in Tokyo, the Edo-Tokyo Museum is housed in a bizarre multi-storey building which is meant to evoke an old raised kurazukuri-style warehouse. It traces the history of the city from 1590 when Tokugawa Ieyasu made Edo the new capital, all the way through the Meiji Restoration of 1868, Kanto earthquake in 1923, and bombings of World War II. It throws light on the life and culture during the Edo era and later periods. The permanent collection includes life-sized replica of the Nihonbashi bridge which led to Edo, the Nakamuraza theatre, and scale models of towns and buildings from the Edo, Meiji and Shōwa periods. Free informative tours after admission are available in several languages, depending on volunteers. Audio guides in Japanese, English, Chinese and Korean are available.

The museum will be closed for renovation from October 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018.


Hours

Sun

9:30

17:00

Mon

Closed

Tue

9:30

17:00

Wed

9:30

17:00

Thu

9:30

17:00

Fri

9:30

17:00

Sat

9:30

19:00

About Edo-Tokyo Museum

 1 Chome-4-1 Yokoami, Sumida-ku, Tōkyō-to 130-0015, Japan

 +81 3-3626-9974

 www.edo-tokyo-museum.or.jp

Edo-Tokyo Museum and Nearby Sights on Map

Sumo Museum

Attached to the Ryōgoku Kokugikan Sumo Arena, the Sumo Museum is a small, quirky gallery dedicated to the history of Japan's national sport

Ryōgoku Kokugikan

The largest sumo arena in Japan with a capacity for 10,000 spectators, this is where grand tournaments or basho are held in January, May and September, starting on the second Sunday of the month

Tabi Museum

Kiyosumi Garden

Not the most famous of Tokyo's gardens, but the Kiyosumi is quite lovely and uncrowded

Capsule Tower

A famous building of Kisho Kurokawa, that reflects the views Japanese had of the future in the70's

Ryogoku Fireworks Museum

Fukagawa Edo Museum

Fresh from a recent renovation, this intimate museum features a wonderfully recreated Tempo-period (1830-1843) neighbourhood - complete with homes, shops, narrow alleyways, and even the local rubbish dump

Sensoji

Sensoji, also known as Asakusa Kannon, is Tokyo's oldest Buddhist temple that dates back to the 7th century AD

Asakusa Jinja

The Asakusa Jinja, also known as Sanja-sama (Shrine of the 3 Gods), is a 17th century Shinto shrine that honors the 3 Japanese men - Hinokuma Hamanari, Hinokuma Takenari, and Haji no Nakatomo who established the Senso-ji temple after finding the bodhisattva Kannon statue in the Sumida river

Akihabara

The area houses thousands of shops selling every technological gadget you can imagine, from computers to gaming consoles and vacuums to DVDs, at reasonable prices