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The Brewmaster's Castle, Washington DC

Competing with the Smithsonian for top castle status in the District is the Victorian mansion of one Christian Heurich, who immigrated to the states from Germany to become a wildly successful real estate baron and brewer.

Competing with the Smithsonian for top castle status in the District is the Victorian mansion of one Christian Heurich, who immigrated to the states from Germany to become a wildly successful real estate baron and brewer. (He also holds the title of world's oldest brewer, having kept up his work until his death at a ripe age of 102.) It's a striking example of Victorian architecture and design, and even if you don't make it to a tour, there's a nice Victorian garden in the back open to the public M-F 10AM-4PM, spring-fall.


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11:30

15:30

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11:30

15:30

About The Brewmaster's Castle

 1307 New Hampshire Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA

 +1 202-429-1894

 [email protected]

 heurichhouse.org

The Brewmaster's Castle and Nearby Sights on Map

Mansion on O Street

The only way you will possibly get a handle on what this mysterious place is about is by visiting it

The Phillips Collection

The Phillips Collection, opened in 1921, is America's first museum of modern art

Anderson House

The Anderson House, which is perhaps better described as a castle, was built in 1902-1905, as the home of Larz Anderson and his wife

Townsend Mansion

Built by Mary Scott Townsend in 1899, the house features a Beaux Arts, French-inspired design

National Geographic Museum

The National Geographic Museum showcases a variety of changing exhibitions on nature, history, and culture

Textile Museum

An extraordinarily elegant small museum that few Washingtonians have heard of, the Textile Museum is fabric heaven

Woodrow Wilson House

President Woodrow Wilson moved here for a quiet retirement after the disastrous setbacks of his late presidency, and lived here for little over 3 years before he died (he was buried in the National Cathedral)

Ringgold-Carroll House

The Ringgold-Carroll House was built in 1825 for Tench Ringgold, who was part of a three-member team in charge of restoring public buildings in the District of Columbia, following the War of 1812

Old Executive Office Building

The Eisenhower Executive Office Building was built in 1871 to house the War and Navy Departments, replacing the obsolete War Office building on the same site

Renwick Gallery

The building that now houses the Renwick Gallery was originally the home of the Corcoran Gallery of Art