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Sorry, we could not find any tours for Supreme Life Building, Chicago

Supreme Life Building, Chicago

Built to house the first African-American insurance company, which was one of the few Black Metropolis businesses to survive the Great Depression.

Built to house the first African-American insurance company, which was one of the few Black Metropolis businesses to survive the Great Depression. The building houses the brand new Bronzeville Visitor Information Center (see below) and is finally undergoing a proper restoration which will restore the 1920 classical façade.


Hours

Sun

9:30

18:30

Mon

NA

Tue

10:00

18:00

Wed

10:00

18:00

Thu

10:00

18:00

Fri

10:00

16:30

Sat

10:00

13:00

About Supreme Life Building

 411 East 35th Street, Chicago, IL, United States

 +1 773-819-5170

 bviconline.info

Supreme Life Building and Nearby Sights on Map

Bronzeville Visitor Information Center

The Bronzeville Visitor Information Center seeks to provide visitors with orientation and offers tours, exhibits, and a small gift shop

Victory Monument (Chicago)

This monument was built in 1928 to honor the service of the African-American Eighth Regiment of the Illinois National Guard in France during World War I

Sunset Cafe

Countless jazz legends played at this legendary jazz club, including: Bix Beiderbecke, Jimmy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, Earl Hines, Fletcher Henderson, Count Basie, and of course, Louis Armstrong

Ida B. Wells House

The home of Ida B Wells, prominent African-American civil rights activist and suffragette, founder of the Black Women's movement, and founding member of the NAACP, lived here from 1919–1929

Eighth Regiment Armory

This was the first armory for an African-American regiment, serving the 'Fighting 8th,' which fought in the Spanish-American War and served with distinction in World War I

Chicago Defender Building

Initially built in 1899 as a Jewish synagogue, this building housed the Chicago Defender (the nation's foremost African-American newspaper through World War I) from 1920-1960

Stephen A Douglas Tomb and Memorial

A 46 ft tall column marks the mausoleum of one of the most prominent senators in US history (a prominent resident from whom the Douglas neighborhood gets its name), who ran and lost against Abraham Lincoln for the U

Unity Hall

Built in 1887 to house a Jewish social organization, this building became famous as the headquarters of the Peoples Movement Club, founded by Oscar Stanton De Priest (1871-1951), the first African-American on Chicago's City Council and the first northern black delegate to the U

South Side Community Art Center (SSCAC)

A community arts center open since 1940, which was for long the only place around where minority artists could exhibit there work

Chicago Bee Building

The home of the Chicago Bee Newspaper, which was founded by Anthony Overton to promote black businesses and issues