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Everett House, Washington DC

Designed by George Oakley Totten, Jr., the house was built in 1914 for industrialist and philanthropist Edward H.

Designed by George Oakley Totten, Jr., the house was built in 1914 for industrialist and philanthropist Edward H. Everett. The house was later used as the Turkish embassy, beginning in 1932, and became the Turkish ambassador's residence in 1999 when a new embassy building was built on Massachusetts Ave. The Everett House features a limestone facade, in Beaux-Arts neoclassic style.


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About Everett House

 2525 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008

Everett House and Nearby Sights on Map

Oak Hill Cemetery

The Gothic chapel and gates were designed by the same architect who designed the Smithsonian Castle

Woodrow Wilson House

President Woodrow Wilson moved here for a quiet retirement after the disastrous setbacks of his late presidency, and lived here for little over 3 years before he died (he was buried in the National Cathedral)

Textile Museum

An extraordinarily elegant small museum that few Washingtonians have heard of, the Textile Museum is fabric heaven

Dumbarton Oaks

Most famous for its role in 1944, when world leaders convened here to draw up the United Nations charter

Townsend Mansion

Built by Mary Scott Townsend in 1899, the house features a Beaux Arts, French-inspired design

Tudor Place

A stately mansion built in 1815 by the son of the first mayor of Georgetown, and the step-granddaughter of one George Washington

Anderson House

The Anderson House, which is perhaps better described as a castle, was built in 1902-1905, as the home of Larz Anderson and his wife

The Phillips Collection

The Phillips Collection, opened in 1921, is America's first museum of modern art

Old Stone House

Built in 1765, this is the oldest original structure in Washington, D

Georgetown

Georgetown is a historic neighborhood on the banks of the Potomac River which is home to the Georgetown University