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Shanghai World Financial Centre Tower, Shanghai

Opened in 2008 and is Shanghai's tallest building.

Opened in 2008 and is Shanghai's tallest building. If you exclude spires and flagpoles, then it contended for the tallest building in the world, at least for a few months. There are 3 viewing levels on floors 94, 97 and 100. The observation level allows you to look down on the tall neighboring Jinmao and Oriental Pearl Towers. However, a better view of the river and the Bund can be obtained from the lower sphere of the Oriental Pearl than form the SWFC. An alternative to the 100F observation deck is to go to one of the hotel bars or restaurants on or near 98F.


Hours

Sun

8:00

23:00

Mon

8:00

23:00

Tue

8:00

23:00

Wed

8:00

23:00

Thu

8:00

23:00

Fri

8:00

23:00

Sat

8:00

23:00

About Shanghai World Financial Centre Tower

 100号 Century Avenue, Pudong, Shanghai, China

 +86 21 3867 2008

 www.swfc-shanghai.com

Shanghai World Financial Centre Tower and Nearby Sights on Map

Jin Mao Tower

Jin Mao Tower is China's third tallest skyscraper, standing just beside Oriental Pearl TV Tower in the middle of Lujiazui Finance and Trade Districts in Pudong

Shanghai Ocean Aquarium

This is an entertaining exhibition over two floors, including a system of glass tunnels that lets you get up close and personal with sharks

Oriental Pearl TV Tower

Built in 1994, it is the 3rd tallest tower in the world

Shanghai Tower

Shanghai Art Gallery

Large international gallery with a frequently changing program

Yunxiang Temple

Originally established in 505 AD, later destroyed, and reconstructed in 2000

Customs House

Featuring a highly visible clocktower nicknamed 'Big Ching'

The Bund

The Bund alongside Huangpu River once was the financial center of the Far East

Yuyuan Garden

A traditional Chinese Ming-style private garden, originally built in 1559 but ransacked and restored several times since then

Huangpu Park

At the northern tip of the Bund, was the legendary home of the 'No dogs or Chinese' sign — which in fact never existed, although Chinese not accompanied by foreigners were indeed banned until 1928