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Santa Costanza, Rome

This church was built by the Emperor Constantine (272-337) as a mausoleum for his daughters Constantina and Helena.

This church was built by the Emperor Constantine (272-337) as a mausoleum for his daughters Constantina and Helena. It was part of a much larger cemetery complex, parts of which can still be seen. The mausoleum was consecrated as a church and dedicated to Constantina when she became a saint in 1254. The building is circular with an inner arcade resting on pairs of granite columns. It retains some marvellous mosaics from the 4th Century.


Hours

Sun

Closed

Mon

9:00

12:00

Tue

9:00

12:00

Wed

9:00

12:00

Thu

9:00

12:00

Fri

9:00

12:00

Sat

9:00

12:00

About Santa Costanza

 Via Nomentana, 349, 00198 Roma, Italy

 www.santagnese.org

Santa Costanza and Nearby Sights on Map

Sant' Agnese fuori le Mura

This church was built next to the mausoleum of Santa Costanza in the 7th Century and is on top of catacombs

Villa Torlonia

The Villa Torlonia is a magnificent neo-Classical patrician house with landscaped English Picturesque gardens dating back to 1806

Quartiere Coppede

With its strange Liberty- style buildings with influence from the Art Nouveau of the 1920s this small bunch of blocks is one of the most interesting, and less known, landmarks of the city

Catacomb of Priscilla

Underground burial place of an ancient Roman family and of seven early popes

Villa Ada

Beautiful park, the largest in Rome at 450 acres/182 hectares

Basilica di San Lorenzo fuori le Mura

Houses the tomb of St Lawrence

Villa Albani

A magnificent patrician house with beautiful gardens

Aurelian Walls

Remains of city walls built between 271 and 275 enclosing all seven hills of Rome, Campus Martius and the Trastevere district

Porta Maggiore

Impressive gate built by Claudius in AD 52 and formed by the arches of two aqueducts

Borghese Museum and Gallery

A lovely display in a beautiful villa setting, which concentrates on the quality rather than the size of its collection